Event:

A Symposium with Simon Critchley - 'The Infinite Demand of Art: No Amount of Effort Will Save You From Oblivion'
Hosted by the Studio 55, School of Fine Art with The Centre for modern Thought, University of Aberdeen for the Glasgow International Festival of Visual Art

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Location:

Glasgow Film Theatre

Open:

26 Apr 2010
Monday,
11:00 - 13:00

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A Symposium with Simon Critchley - 'The Infinite Demand of Art: No Amount of Effort Will Save You From Oblivion'

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A Symposium with Simon Critchley
'The Infinite Demand of Art: No Amount of Effort Will Save You From Oblivion' watch video

The GI symposium refers directly to Simon Critchley's provocative work, Infinitely Demanding: Ethics of Commitment, Politics of Resistance (Verso, 2007) which asserts: 'Philosophy begins in disappointment'. If philosophy begins in the experience of nihilism, for Critchley, it leads to an ethical subjectivity of infinite demand manifest in anarchic metapolitics. Denounced by Slavoj Zizek in an article in the London Review of Books ('Resistance Is Surrender') Critchley's thought was subsequently defended by established academics internationally, including T. J. Clark (Univeristy of California, Berkeley) and David Graeber (Goldsmiths, London) who writes: 'Critchley is one of the few intellectuals who have taken seriously the possibility that those who are actively engaged in fighting capitalism might have something relevant to say.'

The symposium draws upon ethical, political, philosophical and aesthetic perspectives to think the infinite demands of the present.

Professor Simon Critchley is Chair of Philosophy at the New School of Social Research, New York.  He currently teaches a course on 'Thinking the Present,' which addresses many of the questions and concerns which also inform the theme of Glasgow International 2010: 'Past, Present, Future'.  He is the 'chief philosopher' of the International Necronautical Society, a semi-fictional organization modeled upon Futurism and Dada, which he co-founded with the artist and writer Tom McCarthy and which has performed in events at Tate Britain and Athens Biennale.

Publications include The Ethics of Deconstruction (1992), Ethics-Politics-Subjectivity (1999),  Infinitely Demanding (2007), On Heidegger's Being and Time (2008), The Book of Dead Philosophers (2008) and How to Stop Living and Start Worrying is published in the Autumn (2010).

'Critchley is one of the few intellectuals who have taken seriously the possibility that those who are actively engaged in fighting capitalism might have something relevant to say.' David Graeber Goldsmiths, London

The symposium is organised by Studio55, School of Fine Art, The Glasgow School of Art and The Centre for modern Thought, University of Aberdeen for the Glasgow International Festival of Visual Art.