Name:

Nicholas Oddy

Job Title:

Head of Department of Design History & Theory

Department:

School of Design

Contact:

Image:

Nicholas Oddy
Bing Cycle Van

Nicholas Oddy

Profile
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Nicholas Oddy

Went to art school in 1978 (Edinburgh College of Art) intending to be a graphic designer, but ended up as a ceramics and glass maker instead. After post-graduate diploma in Edinburgh, counter-jumped into design history and was awarded Associates of V&A scholarship for the then new Victoria & Albert Museum/Royal College of Art Design History MA.

On qualifying in 1986 taught in Teesside Polytechnic and Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art before Glasgow School of Art in 1993. Joined the nascent Institute of Learning and Teaching (now Higher Education Academy) on its foundation in 1999. Was Academic Staff Governor in GSA 2006-2015 and currently president of GSA UCU. Also chair of panel C in the Scottish Graduate School of Arts & Humanities (SGSAH)

Academic interests tend to be driven by direct engagement with objects in the collectors’ market, mainly relating to late 19th and early 20th century quantity produced items, particularly those relating to cycling and cycling culture generally. In the last few years this has moved into road signage and politics. A founder speaker in the first International Cycling History Conference (1990) and have since been active in its organisation. Also consultant to Phillips and Bonhams Auction rooms for cycling and cycling memorabilia, holding an annual international sale from 1995-2004. Chair of the Cycling History and Educational Trust and Cycling Publishing Ltd and working on a book Cycling Culture, a History . An equal strand of research activity is toy manufacture and collecting, currently focusing on the Service Department of Meccano Ltd; also writing a series of studies on early UK manufacturers. Editor of the Train Collector and contributes to many similar collectors’ publications.

See Nicholas Oddy's research outputs

See Nicholas Oddy's research outputs |

On RADAR. Image: Nicholas Oddy, left, on a 1885 Rudge light roadster