Fashion + Textiles

Key Facts

Staff

Programme Overview

How to Apply

Further Information on applying to the Graduate School is available from registry@gsa.ac.uk

Award

MDes Fashion + Textiles. All GSA degree programmes are validated by the University of Glasgow. Established in 1451, the University of Glasgow is a member of the prestigious Russell Group of leading UK research universities and a founder member of Universitas 21, an international grouping of universities dedicated to setting worldwide standards for higher education.

Facilities
Studio-based with workshops for weave, print and dye knit, embroidery and CAD. Students in the department also have access to the Centre for Advanced Textiles (CAT) and digital jacquard weave.

Studios are open from 8.00am - 10.00pm weekdays, and 08.00am - 6.00pm weekends.
Workshops are supervised from 9.00 am - 5.00 pm weekdays.



Programme Leader
Jimmy Stephen-Cran, BA (Hons) MA


Tutors
Alan Gallacher
Juliet Dearden
Julia Maclean
Tony Brotheridge

Programme Overview

The MDes in Fashion and Textiles at the Glasgow School of Art is an advanced skills postgraduate programme designed to meet the ambitions of motivated Fashion and Textile Graduates who wish to extend, develop and hone their individual 'design signature'.

The programme attracts and welcomes two different 'types' of Fashion Design Student each with a characteristically different approach.

One can broadly be described as 'Textile (or surface) led' with a design approach considered to be from the 'Textile-outwards'. The other can broadly be described as 'Silhouette (or shape) led' with a design approach considered to be from the 'Silhouette-inwards'.

Textile-led Fashion Designers are more concerned with the surface (print, embroidery, decoration) or structure (weave, knit) of the fabric in a garment and tend to think more in two dimensions when designing. Silhouette led designers are more concerned with the shape, cut, outline and construction of a garment and tend to think more in three dimensions when designing.

An everyday example might be the difference between an Arran jumper and a tailored jacket. In an Arran jumper (textile led) it is the decorative effect of the cables and the structure of the knit which 'leads' the garment. Also, the textile and garment are created and considered simultaneously. In a tailored jacket (silhouette led) it is the shape, cut, outline and construction which 'leads' the garment. Also, the textile and garment are created and considered separately.

A particular strength of the MDes programme is the interrelatedness of the practice and theory.  All written work requires students to integrate reflections of their own design practice as a component part of any text.

The programme also connects to the research strategy of The Glasgow School of Art in its links with the Centre for Advanced Textiles (CAT) Research Centre.