Event:

Race, Rights and Sovereignty – ‘Participatory history as Restorative history: Mapping the history of British colonial camps in Kenya’, Chao Tayiana Maina
GSASA / GSA Exhibitions

Event Type:

Guest Lecture

Location:

Online

Open:

23 Nov 2021
Tuesday,
16:00 - 17:30

Quicklinks:

Image:

‘Digital Visualisation of a detention camp in Kenya, Aguthi Works Camp’, (2019)
Photo credit: Museum of British Colonialism

Race, Rights and Sovereignty – ‘Participatory history as Restorative history: Mapping the history of British colonial camps in Kenya’, Chao Tayiana Maina

Event info
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Race, Rights and Sovereignty

‘Participatory history as Restorative history: Mapping the history of British colonial camps in Kenya’
Chao Tayiana Maina

23 November 2021, 4pm

Race, Rights & Sovereignty are delighted to be welcoming Chao Tayiana Maina to The Glasgow School of Art to deliver an online lecture ‘Participatory history as Restorative history: Mapping the history of British colonial camps in Kenya’. This event will be chaired by Dr Ranjana Thapalyal. 

This lecture will explore the healing and restorative aspects of participatory work through the experience of the Museum of British Colonialism (MBC) team members in Kenya. For 4 years MBC has been documenting the sites and structures of detention camps set up by the British colonial government during the state of emergency (1952 - 1960). 

Today, some physical remains of these camps are present in Kenya. Since independence in 1963, however, little has been done to preserve and understand this era. Children are educated in classrooms that were once detention cells and torture chambers but have no idea about this history. Memory of these detention camps has also been systemically erased through the British colonial government’s program - ‘Operation Legacy’ - which saw the deliberate destruction of archival records to conceal this past.

Documenting and preserving the memory of these centres is not only important in raising historical awareness it is also a reclamation of narrative and a chance to come to terms with open wounds that are at the core of Kenya's national identity. 

 

Bios

Chao Tayiana Maina is a Kenyan digital heritage specialist and digital humanities scholar working at the intersection of culture and technology. Her work primarily focuses on the application of technology in the preservation, engagement and dissemination of African heritage. She is the founder of African Digital Heritage, a co-founder of the Museum of British Colonialism and a co-founder of the Open Restitution Africa project. She holds an MSc International Heritage Visualisation (distinction) and a BSc Mathematics and Computer Science. Her research work explored the possibilities of embedding intangible histories in 3D digital environments. She is a recipient of the Google Anita Borg scholarship for women in technology.

Her work has been featured in the New York Times, Reuters, BBC news, BBC Arts, Ntv, KBC and 3Sat.

Dr. Ranjana Thapalyal is an Indian born inter-disciplinary artist and academic based in Scotland. Her practice spans ceramics, painting, and ephemeral mixed media. Research areas include materiality, cultural and social identity, and the metaphysical self in relation to all of these.  Of particular interest are concepts of self in South Asian and West African traditions, feminist readings of ancient philosophies of the global South, cultural politics, and the development of decolonising, inter-disciplinary and inter-cultural strategies for art pedagogy and social and environmental harmony. Thapalyal's book, Education as Mutual Translation, a Yoruba and Ancient Indian Interface for Pedagogy in the Creative Arts (Brill 2018), proposes an adaptive, student led pedagogy premised on critical aspects of Yoruba and Vedantic thought, sensitive to history and student contexts. Other recent writing can be found in Art MonthlyMAP, and Panel publications.

The Race, Rights & Sovereignty series is a free programme of public lectures, workshops and other events delivered by The Glasgow School of Art and The Art School: GSA's Students' Association. For more information on the series visit: 

www.racerightssovereignty.com